The Case of the Kissing Strangers

January 6, 2016

 

It’s a fact of life that the more actions we take, the more committed we become.

 

It’s both powerful and subtle. The more action, time and money people put into something, the more committed they become to doing it. 

 

Here’s an example of this principle:

 

A young woman was stopped on the street by an attractive, nicely dressed man who said, “ Excuse me, I’m involved in a contest and I need a good-looking woman like you to help me win.”

 

He went on to explain that he was getting points for the contest by getting complete strangers to kiss him. The woman was flattered enough that after thinking about it, she gave him a peck on the cheek.

 

The man then said, “Hey, you’re a great kisser. But the real contest I’m trying to win is to sell magazine subscriptions. Would you be interested in buying any of these magazines?”

 

At first, the woman wanted to slap him in the face, but she had already made a commitment of sorts by kissing him and therefore felt compelled to buy a magazine subscription from him.

 

This “kissing stranger” experiment was repeated many times with the same result.

 

The more actions we take and the more we invest in something, the more committed we become to its success.

 

So how do you use this information to get donors to become more committed?   The fact is that the more actions, the more involved your donors become with your cause and the more they will invest in your success. 

 

 
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